Sunday, February 5, 2012

real or not real?




Real. Although I think it looks like a tissue paper rose.
I also think it's a bit creepy, like Miss Havisham's table in Great Expectations:


I crossed the staircase landing, and entered the room she indicated. From that room, too, the daylight was completely excluded, and it had an airless smell that was oppressive. A fire had been lately kindled in the damp old-fashioned grate, and it was more disposed to go out than to burn up, and the reluctant smoke which hung in the room seemed colder than the clearer air - like our own marsh mist. Certain wintry branches of candles on the high chimneypiece faintly lighted the chamber: or, it would be more expressive to say, faintly troubled its darkness. It was spacious, and I dare say had once been handsome, but every discernible thing in it was covered with dust and mould, and dropping to pieces. The most prominent object was a long table with a tablecloth spread on it, as if a feast had been in preparation when the house and the clocks all stopped together. An epergne or centrepiece of some kind was in the middle of this cloth; it was so heavily overhung with cobwebs that its form was quite undistinguishable; and, as I looked along the yellow expanse out of which I remember its seeming to grow, like a black fungus, I saw speckled-legged spiders with blotchy bodies running home to it, and running out from it, as if some circumstances of the greatest public importance had just transpired in the spider community.

I heard the mice too, rattling behind the panels, as if the same occurrence were important to their interests. But, the blackbeetles took no notice of the agitation, and groped about the hearth in a ponderous elderly way, as if they were short-sighted and hard of hearing, and not on terms with one another.

These crawling things had fascinated my attention and I was watching them from a distance, when Miss Havisham laid a hand upon my shoulder. In her other hand she had a crutch-headed stick on which she leaned, and she looked like the Witch of the place.

"This," said she, pointing to the long table with her stick, "is where I will be laid when I am dead. They shall come and look at me here."

With some vague misgiving that she might get upon the table then and there and die at once, the complete realization of the ghastly waxwork at the Fair, I shrank under her touch.

"What do you think that is?" she asked me, again pointing with her stick; "that, where those cobwebs are?"

"I can't guess what it is, ma'am."

"It's a great cake. A bride-cake. Mine!"

— Charles Dickens, from Chapter 11, Great Expectations


Okay, maybe it's not quite that creepy. Dickens did have a way with words, didn't he?


(linking to macro monday)

17 comments:

Senna said...

The surface of the roses is really looking like a kind of structure paper and makes the impression and effect of the photogrph more plastically.
Best regards Senna

Kay L. Davies said...

You're right. It's not Dickensian-creepy. However, there's something about the texture of the petals that seems unreal.
Does it look better when it's not in close-up?
Beautiful photography, though, Leslie. You do have a fine skill for observation.
Love, K

Loree said...

That roe really does look unreal and a bit ghostly. Miss Havisham is possibly one of the saddest figures in English literature.

Jodi said...

Okay, I now want to reread Great Expectations, or at least watch the old black and white movie :)
I like the photos of the ghostly roses. Do they have a scent?

ayala said...

It looked unreal until I looked closer :)

Elizabeth said...

I thought it was a linen napkin.

Wonderful post -- and a reminder to delve into Dickens again!

Emily said...

Why does President Snow always have to leave us roses?

Butterfly Works said...

Haven't read that in ages....maybe it's time to revisit....

At first I thought it was a napkin but then looking more closely, you can see the texture of the petals....
A good lesson for life....you need to check closely to see if things are real or not......

Have a good week my friend...

S. Etole said...

It looks like it is made of white crepe fabric ... a certain pallor about it.

♥ w o o l f ♥ said...

well, i can't say if GE is out, out in the world, but it was on at the bbc, over x-mas, so i suppose it is gettable?
when i watch a bbc dickens, i savour the words through the images that pass the eye. here now, this passage, i see it again, and when you will view this scene, and g. anderson, of course, you will enjoy it. triple.
i think there is indeed a wonder whether this rose is real, or not. i couldn't say, and either way, i find it fascinating. it actually also makes me crave for sweet, soft, delicious creme...
ha!
n♥

Fernando Santos (Chana) said...

Excelentes fotografias....
Cumprimentos

Tracy said...

Wow...it does have tissue paper, silk look... I thought it was faux until I kept reading. It does look like a rose that's had it's last dance... Did you know that the BBC did a new adaptation of Great Expectations the end of last year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b018wmhr Happy Day, Leslie ((HUGS))

Joyce said...

It does look like paper. In one photo I thought it was fabric folded to look like a rose. Nice! xo

Ostriches Look Funny said...

I thought it was fake!!
And Miss Havisham is probably the creepiest character in literature. At least she was when I was in high school. She haunted me in high school.

marit´s,,, said...

So cool pictures, I was a good idea because I thought it was a rose.
Thanks for the nice comment on my blog.
Marit, Norway.

Tatjana Parkacheva said...

Beautiful work.

Regards and best wishes

Kala said...

Fabulous details in these photos and I now see where these are real petals.

Happy MM